Oatmeal Bread

I love baking bread. It just makes the house smell so good. And I know it doesn’t have ingredients I can’t pronounce in it. It also allows for some really easy lunches – sandwiches! Though I’ve tried many bread recipes, my go-to recipe is always Amish white bread. It has the soft texture and flaky crumbiness that just works. I try to have some slices in my freezer at all times. Sometimes, I want some variety, though. Whole wheat bread, rye bread, and  sourdough bread are great, but oatmeal bread? That’s something new to me. So when I saw Alton make bread using leftover oatmeal, I just knew I had to try it. And I did, the very same day. I didn’t eat oatmeal for breakfast, though. I cooked it just for use in the recipe. It was definitely worth it.

This bread is amazing with some salted butter or fruity jam. It’s great for breakfast, and healthy, too! Put some in the freezer for fresh bread the entire week. Those oats are good for your cholesterol, according to the Cheerios commercial. This is a bread that I’ll definitely be keeping in my bread-baking rotation. I might double the recipe next time, though. It takes a lot of time to only yield one loaf. And maybe try to make it in my mixer because after being spoiled by my dough hook, kneading by hand gets tiring (though it wasn’t nearly as hard as kneading bagels).

Oatmeal Bread, adapted from Alton Brown:

Make one loaf – I got 16 slices.


  • 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast (or 1 packet)
  • 11 ounces bread flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1/4 cup uncooked rolled oats
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 12 ounces cooked oats (to make this, use 3/4 cup oats and 1 1/2 cups water), at room temperature (you don’t want to kill that yeast!)
  • 1/4 cup warm water
  • 2 tablespoons agave syrup (I used one tablespoon honey because I ran out of agave. Use both honey if you don’t have agave, or substitute with sugar)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon raw oats
  • 1 egg + water, for eggwash


1. Combine yeast, flour, 1/4 cup uncooked oats, and salt in a small bowl. Set aside.

2. Combine cooked oats, agave, water, and oil in a large mixing bowl.

3. In three increments, add dry ingredients to wet. Mix with a wooden spoon until completely incorporated.

4. Knead by hand on a floured surface for about 10 minutes, until the dough is smooth. Add more flour if it’s too sticky.

5. Oil bowl, add dough, and cover. Let rise for an hour.

6. Punch down dough and shape into loaf. Place in greased loaf pan.

7. Cover in plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight, or for at least 8 hours.

8. Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

9. Combine the egg yolk and water in a small bowl. Brush the top of the loaf with egg wash and sprinkle with the remaining tablespoon of raw oats.

10. Bake for 55 minutes to 1 hour (actually it took me 1 hour, 10 minutes), until the internal temperature of the dough reaches 210 degrees.

11. Cool on rack for 30 minutes before slicing.

Honey-Lemon Throat Lozenges

Ha-choo – this Kosher Foodie was sick. And while usually people prefer chicken soup, this throat soother is much easier to eat while lying in bed watching TV. Plus, staying in bed all day is b-o-r-i-n-g and you know I like to make candy and would rather be in the kitchen than doing nothing all day.

I got this recipe from Alton’s first Good Eats book. (And yes, I did buy the second one, the Middle Ages, I just haven’t had time to photograph and write up recipe yet! There are way too many things on my Kosher Foodies to do list.)

So, Alton made 200 lozenges. I decided to quarter his recipe, hoping that my throat wouldn’t hurt long enough to need all of them! Turns out, I wish I did make that many. They were so delicious! Honey and lemon, what a great combination! I kept eating them even after my throat was all healed. I used really good quality honey that my parents brought home from Costa Rica. I’m glad I found such a great use for it! You can use whichever type of honey you have around the house.


  • 4 ounces sugar
  • 3 ounces honey
  • About 2 tablespoons water
  • Zest of one lemon


1. Combine sugar, honey, and water in a very small saucepan. Mix together. Place over high heat until boiling.

2. Cover for 4 minutes.

3. Remove the cover and place a candy thermometer inside. When mixture reaches 295 degrees, remove from heat and let cool for five minutes. Mixture should thicken.

4. Mix in lemon zest.

5. Using a 1/2 teaspoon measure, drop onto parchment or silicone mat lined baking sheet, making sure to leave some space between them, because they’ll spread.

6. Work quickly, because the mixture thickens really quickly.

7. Let cool for 1/2 hour and store in an air-tight container. Separate layers using parchment paper. These will last for about a week at room temperature.

Cream Puffs

Pate a Choux is not as daunting as it sounds. As long as you have a little bit of patience, it will definitely be rewarded. I first made this dough when I watched Alton Brown’s Good Eats episode on it. He made his eclairs with vanilla pudding, so I did too. This time, I wanted to make my own filling, and what better place to look than the Art and Soul of Baking cookbook. I knew it was the best combination because between the two recipes I needed exactly one stick of butter. They were meant to be combined. I also like the look of little teeny puffs, so I piped concentric circles instead of long Ss.

For the pastry, adapted from Alton Brown:


  • 1 cup water
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 pinch kosher salt
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1-2 large egg whites


1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

2. Boil water, butter, salt, and sugar.

3. Dump all the flour in at once and stir with a wooden spoon, working until the dough comes together into a ball.

4. Transfer the mixture to the bowl of your stand mixer and let sit about five minutes, until it cools down a bit.4

5. With the mixer on its lowest speed, add eggs one at a time, waiting until incorporated before adding the next one.

6. Transfer the dough to a piping bag fitted with a round tip (or a zip-top bag with a corner snipped off, which is what I did).

7. Pipe into golfball-sized concentric circles, about 2 inches apart on parchment-lined baking sheets.

8. Bake for 10 minutes, then turn the oven down to 350 degrees and bake for another 10 minutes until golden brown.

9. Remove from oven and immediately pierce the bottom with a paring knife to let out the steam.

For the pastry cream:

  • 1 1/2 cups whole milk
  • 1 vanilla bean (or 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract)
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 6 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/4 cup all purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter


1. Pour the milk into a medium saucepan. If using a vanilla bean, cut in half and scrape seeds into the milk. Add the bean to the milk. Heat until the milk is just simmering, remove from heat.

2. In a medium bowl, whisk together egg, egg yolks, and sugar until smooth.

3. Add the flour and whisk some more, until smooth

4. Pour about 1/2 cup of the milk into the egg mixture, whisking constantly to temper the yolks. Pour back into the sauce pan (while whisking, of course)

5. Heat the mixture, whisking constantly, until it reaches a boil. Cook for another minute until the cream is very thick.

6. Remove from heat and whisk in the butter and vanilla extract, if using. Strain it over a bowl and place plastic wrap directly on surface of the cream. Cool completely either in a bowl of ice water or in the fridge.

To assemble:

1. Cut the pastry in half.

2. Place a spoonful of pastry cream onto the bottom of the dough.

3. Place the top on.

4. Eat!

Banana Ice Cream with Peanut Butter Swirl

I don’t buy bananas often, because even though I hang them from my handy dandy dough hook, they turn from green to brown. The yellow stage is skipped altogether, and I’m left with a bunch of inedible bananas. Sure, I can make banana bread, banana muffins, or banana cookies, but one tires of those pretty quickly. Continue reading

Salmon Packet

Don’t have time to make a delicious fish dish? Think again! Cooking in foil or parchment paper is a quick and easy method, plus it’s very forgiving. I made mine with salmon, whole wheat couscous, veggies, and white wine. I got the idea from Alton Brown, obviously. He has a blackboard full of ideas on pouch cooking in this episode.

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Hot Chocolate Mix

I know it isn’t really hot chocolate season, but this is the reason that you need this post. Ever get home and just really want a mug of hot chocolate only to realize that you have no more little packets Well, after making this you won’t need any.

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Half-Pound Cake

Pound cake is pretty much what it sounds like…You measure out a pound of all the ingredients, mix them together, and lo and behold you have a delicious, rich cake. It lasts a pretty long time on the counter, too. If you don’t have a kitchen scale, I’m not sure this is the right cake for you. I did take note of the volume, but I’m not sure how accurate those are. My advice? Get a kitchen scale! You can get a good one for 20 dollars. The smell alone is worth it. Continue reading

Homemade Marshmallows

I like making candy. I never really thought marshmallows were candy until I made them, but now I know they are. Making them involves cooking sugar and corn syrup to the “soft ball” stage, and anything that involves cooking sugar and using a thermometer is candy to me. The result is just very different than some candies we’re used to!

At first I thought making these would be hard. Plus I’ve never used gelatin before, but making marshmallows is surprisingly easy and very fast (except for the 4-hour waiting time while they set). Try it at your own risk – you’ll want to make them all the time. My favorite way to eat them is in hot chocolate. You can also add them to your ice cream, melt them on top of brownies, or make s’mores…the possibilities are endless. Did I mention they taste better than store bought ones? Continue reading

Overnight Cinnamon Rolls

Tomorrow is Yom Kippur, and all I want to break the fast on is cinnamon buns. This recipe is very easy, and though there’s a lot of wait time, it’s worth it.

Can you tell that I really like cinnamon buns?


The recipe yields a tender dough. The egg yolks make it rich, and the buttermilk adds a hint of tang to the recipe. I changed Alton’s recipe only a little bit because I didn’t have any instant yeast.

Everyone’s really excited to eat these tomorrow after 25 hours of fasting. Continue reading

Alton’s Tortellini

After watching the Good Eats episode “Use Your Noodle 2” (twice) I decided to try making my own tortellini. I had wanted to try homemade pasta for a while, but I don’t have a pasta maker. Alton said I can make these tortellini without one, so I had to try it. I spent a few hours making this batch, and ended up with a little more than 50 tortellinis (and messed up only four).


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