Parmesan Black Pepper Biscotti

I love making biscotti. But it’s always a dessert or after dinner treat. This biscotti is savory, and can be served before a meal or alongside a salad. It’s really yummy, and can be eaten in place of bread sticks.

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Soy Dijon Asparagus

Do you get excited when asparagus starts showing up at the farmer’s market? I do, and I usually just roast it with some salt and pepper, and maybe some paprika or garlic powder. But, obviously, I’m always looking for new ways to prepare my favorite foods, and this easy recipe caught my eye right away.

The asparagus is just blanched and dressed in a simple vinaigrette, so it’s totally different from my usual preparation, but shows off the fresh springtime flavors nicely. I bet the dressing would be delicious on a green salad, or even Brussels sprouts!

Asparagus Salad with Soy-Mustard Dressing from The New York Times
serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound thick asparagus, trimmed and peeled
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 egg yolks, preferably organic
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • Extra virgin olive oil as necessary.

Directions:

1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Cook asparagus just until bright green but tender, up to 4 or 5 minutes for thicker spears. Drain and immediately rinse with cold water (or, better still, plunge into ice water). Drain again and set aside. (You can wrap asparagus and refrigerate for up to a day at this point. Bring to room temperature before serving.)

2. Whisk together mustard, egg yolks, soy sauce, lemon juice and just enough olive oil (start with a tablespoon) to make a smooth dressing. Toss with asparagus and serve.

Quinoa with Beets and Spinach

I’m always looking for new and interesting quinoa recipes. It gets boring to only put roasted vegetables or canned corn with dressing. So when I found a recipe for quinoa with golden beets and raisins, I knew I wanted to try it out, just tweaked a little bit. First of all, I can never find golden beets in the fruit store or supermarket! So I used the regular red ones. Anyway, I like red ones better anyway. Also, the original recipe called for feta cheese. And I don’t like feta cheese, so I left it out. Continue reading

Turkey Potstickers

We really have to thank our good friend and culinary school graduate Adam Mimran for this recipe. He’s the one who’s tested it many times and took the time to make them for a crowd during the Superbowl. Funny thing is, this has been on mine and Steph’s to do lists for quite some time. Oh well. Sometimes you have to rely on friends to cook things for you. If you plan on making them for a crowd, double the recipe. Continue reading

Carrot Miso Soup with Sesame

I have been really into Asian flavors lately, and I have started to keep white miso paste in my refrigerator to make quick miso soups for those nights that I don’t feel like cooking dinner. This is even better, because you know what else I always have? Carrots! And onions! And sesame oil. You really can’t skip the sesame oil in this recipe, it magnifies the deliciousness of the soup.

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Peas in the Style of Tuscany

This side dish is so easy, and I love peas. The best part? You can make it all year long, since it’s great with frozen peas. If it’s springtime and you want to bother with shelling fresh peas, feel free, but I find that frozen ones are just fine.

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Broccoli Soup

Can you tell that I like soup? It’s a warm, wintry way to add a vegetable to your dinner, and leftovers make the perfect lunch alongside a simple sandwich. Ever since I watched Mario Batali make broccoli soup (and it looked so easy!) I knew I had to try it. Someone recommended the recipe for broccoli soup from Chef at Home, thickened with oatmeal, and I knew I had to try it for a few reasons. 1. I never had soup thickened with oatmeal, and I wondered how it would taste, and if it would really make it thick enough (could’ve used more), 2. Oatmeal is good for milk production and it’s always nice to add it to dishes when I can, 3. We like finding gluten free recipes, and oats, unlike chunks of day-old bread, make this soup gluten free. Turns out, we like broccoli soup! Continue reading

Beet Raita

The best part about eating Indian is the colorful variety. I already made a vivid green palak paneer, so  I needed a contrasting side dish: This is an easy solution, and the yogurt has a cooling affect against the peppery spinach dish.

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Paneer

I’ve experimented with Indian food before, but when I found an Indian cookbook in the food section of my library, I decided to try again. How to Cook Indian: More Than 500 Classic Recipes for the Modern Kitchen by Sanjeev Kapoor is a great introduction to Indian cooking, and I even renewed it so I could experiment with some more difficult recipes, too. Sorry, neighbors, for smelling up the hallway!

The first and easiest thing I made was paneer, an Indian pressed cheese.

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Yemenite Soup

I love Yemenite soup. Lucky for me, I live pretty close to David’s and I can order it in any time. But like any foodie, I had to try to make it myself. The first time I tried, it was a major fail. It was too thin, not meaty enough, and I really just wouldn’t share the recipe. Fast forward a few months, and someone told me that the Taste cookbook had a great recipe, and I knew that I needed to find someone with a copy and look at the recipe. And I did. I changed the recipe just a bit, and prepped all the ingredients. Much to my surprise, the soup was SO easy to make! Except for the spice mix, but that was Zeke’s job.

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